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20121211
20121211
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the people in new jersey and new york are not left high and drive. because it's a national issue. when there's an emergency, we just don't all say, everybody on their own. which is often your theory. no, everybody in this country isn't always on their own. we are a national community. and when there's a tragedy, when there's some kind of event in new jersey, new york, we all have a responsibility, accountability. don't use that as a dodge for saying, let's act. the auto industry would have been on its -- just destroyed. >> about 1.5 million jobs, i might add. >> absolutely. and we had accountability there. >> let me get a word in here. i know you want to dominate the conversation -- >> no, i want you to get to the point. >> we now agree there should be additional language in the legislation to have accountability. that is a great point. so far there wasn't that accountability when you voted in the past on a bailout to states in this area. it's good that we moved that point. i look forward to working with you to provide that accountability. >> there was accountability in terms of help for gm
as thousands of union members plan to protest at the state capital. the story continues inside the new york times. we are getting your take on this this morning. start dialing in now. the wall street journal editorial page, they weigh in on the issue this morning. you can tell this is a big deal, based on the fury of big labor's reaction. edie in greenville, south carolina, democratic caller. is it eddie? i'm sorry. good morning. caller: good morning. i live in a work state and does not benefit the employer is at all. a company just moved into it charleston, boeing. they had the first test flight or three months ago on the 787. that was catastrophic. the wheel well caught on fire. other things did not work that were supposed to put out the fire instantly. it's not about quantity. it is quality. you need experienced union people. the unions have built this country and it will continue on , no matter what these guys try to do. >host: why would union workers be better qualified? caller: these people in charleston got to have the experience. i have seen many generations of different aircraft. y
, puerto ricans in new york and chicago, very liberal, seeing the rise of foreign born latinos and their children who tend to be more conservative. on abortion, the majority believe it should be legal compared to 40% of the rest of the population. marriage, that's shifting. it is certainly shifted in the past five years, but there's still a good chunk of that electorat that's conservative when it comes to marriage. the question is with social issues is not are you going to scare voters away? you believe that those who vote exclusively for those -- are mostly religious people who are going to vote for the candidate who has the traditional positions. nobody's not going to go against the cap date because of the position of life and marriage within the community. >> right. it's scary for me because it's a place we're not looking to the future. as a republicans, we're counting on the older ones, not how the changes. >> you'll be surprised. with the children of foreign born latinos, there's still much more conservative than the rest of the population. >> okay. we'll come back to this
. no early voting in new jersey and new york, the states hardest hit so you had the week before, in other states you might have -- in north carolina significant number of the electorate already voted. so in both states ex-if if you cast a provisional ballot, it doesn't count at all. fortunately the state at the last minute had executive orders that opened that up. but how much education they were able get to out when people were just trying to unbury their lives and didn't have electricity and power. so allowing people who cast provisional ballots would have provided more flexibility, understanding ahead of time so people knew they could have gone to another precinct and voted and haste count. we want people to have their ballots counted but it wasn't able to get back to that location, so look at ways to expand the ability of people to vote and other options. expanding the way you vote permanently and looking how you inform people about the polling locations and ways -- text-messaging, or other -- that clearly broke down. >> for me, the problem with the electoral college. my job is to get
introduce adam, supreme court correspondent for "the new york times." >> as david said, you guys are in for a treat. you really couldn't ask for a better panel to think through these issues how to balance integrity and access. i'm going to say a word about each of the panelists, their biographical material is available to you. then we'll hear brief presentations from each of them and a more general conversation and save time for your questions at the end. natalie tennant is the secretary of state in west virginia. she's the state's most transparent office holder. i'm literal minded so i half expected a ghost. more seriously she's also had more investigations and convictions for election violations than any other secretary in west virginia's history. maybe later on we can talk about what the data is and what kinds of problems election administrators face. and then hear from ground zero of the 2012 elections is secretary of state of ohio, jon husted, who has had a distinguished career before his current job in the ohio legislature as having served as speaker of the ohio house and a
the idea of get steam rolled by high-population states. for example, california and new york or illinois. but that's exactly what these senate rules changes would allow. this isn't just some wild supposition on my part. the majority leader himself said the filibuster -- and i'm quoting here -- "is a unique privilege that serves to aid small states from being trampled by the desires of larger states." he went on to say -- and i'm quoting again -- "it's one of the most sacred rules of the senate." of course that was a few years ago, before he proposed to do the very thing that he is now -- that he has criticized. he now appears ready to undermine the most important rule, not by a two-thirds vote as clearly required by senate rule 22, but by a simple majority fiat. this contradicts long-standing practice and disregards the 67-vote threshold that president lyndon baines johnson said -- quote -- "he preserves indisputably the character of the senate." this is the same so-called nuclear option that democrats previously decried as breaking the rules to change the rules. for example, the senior
that because now there was magnetic tape. before that you had to go to fancy, highly capitalized studios in new york or l.a. or chicago. to record. so now the artist you are talking about are able to take advantage to communicate with these new technologies. on the education, can i say, i'm an old-fashioned guy. i still want those kids to come to a seminar on a campus for a while. i do. very much. but i'm also teaching a course next year and i'm trying to figure out how to get my 15-minute chunks looking at a camera and how to integrate that with the courses i teach students at penn. we are early days of this. nobody thinks -- >> a question there. >> carol thompson from strategic consulting. i have a question for each of the three panelists. we have been talking about innovation, education, and we have been talking what we are hoping for the future. i would like to ask you about the future. what are your greatest fears and your greatest hopes for 2016 and, 2020? it's a small question. >> i'm presume you don't think the world is going to end december 21st. . >> you are in a whole different compa
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7

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